white wine sangria with blackberries and rosemary

by Eva Felis on July 25, 2014

blackberry sangria

A certain sign and kind of proof that I drift from adolescence into adulthood is the change of my taste. Obviously also a change into bad humor, as I should rather say: senility lies in wait. Growing up nothing could be sweet enough and I had been able to eat bags of candies. Nowadays the very thought of it, hurts my stomach and gives me toothache. My first experience with coffee or even wine went along with a sugar high, both had been judged as too bitter and I improved with tablespoons of sugar. All this had altered, I still appreciate donuts and cupcakes but prefer less sweeter fruit tarts. If it comes to wine, it has to be at least a dryer version of semi-sweet and that also reflects the kind of sangria I prefer. Forgotten are those bottles labeled “Sangria” in colorful letters, which also translates in “headache”, containing a potpourri of red wine from the bottom of barrels from all other the world. Homemade is the best, and that’s also true for wine and fruit based beverages. In summer times I prefer white to red wine, for it’s light and crisp taste.

blackberry sangria

blackberry sangria

blackberry-rosemary sangria
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • 340 g / 12 oz. blackberries, picked over and rinsed
  • 1 (750 ml) bottle white wine
  • 80 ml / ⅓ cup Cointreau, triple sec or other orange liqueur
  • 1 stalk of fresh rosemary - 2 more stalks of rosemary for decoration
Instructions
  1. Combine blackberries, wine, liqueur and one stalk of rosemary in a pitcher. Keep chilled for 2 – 24 hours.
  2. Cut the remaining stalks of rosemary for decoration. Serve with ice cubes on hot days.
Notes
I used Vinho Verde, a young white wine from the Minho region in Portugal. It's a light, fresh and slightly sparkling wine with a little acidity.

blackberry sangria

 


 

Weltmeisterbrot – world champion bread

by Eva Felis on July 18, 2014

weltmeisterbrot-1417

Is it okay to talk about soccer on a food blog? Especially me as someone usually total uninterested and clueless person when it comes to sports, but to my defense I truly enjoyed watching the world cup. And you know why, because Germany won that golden thing! That might be old news for you, but some fun facts are: it’s said the trophy is hollow and the winning team just gets a replicate with platted gold to take home. So even I figured out, winning the world cup is not all about the glory and the fake trophy, it’s about getting people together – actually nations – to share tears of joy and sometimes frustration. And also play soccer, needless to say…

weltmeisterbrot-5520

I still remember Germany’s last world cup win 24 years ago, yes I am that old. My friend Julia and I watched every (!) game, sitting in front of the TV, each of us armed with a bottle of coke, a bag of potato chips and a lot of other sweet stuff. This little ritual of us, was actually not approved by our parents… We knew every player by name and spend hours talking about soccer, although we had no clue about the rules. Can you imagine us jumping up and down under influence of all this sugar? Julia fought hard with her parents to get a dog just to call this poor thing Rudi Völler. Retrospective I have to say, luckily her parents didn’t agree.

Back then the bakery in our neighborhood created a Weltmeisterbrot – world champion bread. That name was a genius marketing strategy. Just kidding. Nevertheless this bread had been one of my favorite ones and had been available for many years, I guess that speaks in favor of this bread.

This is my version of the Weltmeisterbrot, quite close to the original. The noteworthy about this bread is the great mix of seeds and the carrots. You can throw in whatever seeds you have on hand, but for me there have to be some poppy seeds for the crunch. Also roasted sunflower seeds bring nice flavor to the party and pair very well with the carrots, which are responsible for the nice color and a moist bread. Grating the carrots might be an extra step, but after all it’s an easy yeast bread to make.

weltmeisterbrot-1421

You might find this helpful about how to score or slash your bread.

Weltmeisterbrot - world champion bread
 
Author:
Recipe type: bread
Cuisine: German
Ingredients
  • 300 g / 10.6 oz. bread flour + more for dusting
  • 200 g / 7 oz. whole wheat flour
  • 3 tsp. active dry yeast
  • 2 tsp. fine sea salt
  • 2 Tbsp. olive or sunflower oil
  • 200 g / 7 oz. (about 4) carrots, finely grated
  • 80 g / 2.8 oz. roasted sunflower seeds
  • 30 g / 1.1 oz. poppy seeds
  • 200 g / 7 oz. plain yoghurt (I used Greek low fat)
  • 120- 240 ml / ½ - 1 cup lukewarm water
Instructions
  1. Combine all of the ingredients in the mixing bowl. Add just enough water, the dough should be smooth and a little sticky. Mix on low speed using the dough hook for 5 minutes. Transfer the dough to a greased bowl, dust with some flour and cover it with plastic wrap. Allow it to rise until doubled, about 1 hour.
  2. Grease your 23 cm / 9x5 inch loaf pan. Place the dough into the loaf pan cover with plastic wrap and allow it to rise again until doubled, about 30 minutes.
  3. cd 220 C / 425 F oven for 20 minutes. Then reduce the heat to 200 C / 400 F and bake for additional 25 - 30 minutes until the crust is dark and the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when tapped. Remove the bread from the pan and cool on a wire rack.

 

 


 

raspberry-marzipan coffee cake

by Eva Felis on July 7, 2014

Raspberry-Marzipan Coffee Cake-3

This cake is long gone, its life span had been cut short – literally cut in pieces – and is countable in hours, certainly not days. The minute I moved it from the oven to a rack to cool, I almost attacked it with a knife. I could hardly pull myself together to wait long enough to take a few pictures. I am that marzipan nutz. As soon as the raspberry-marzipan coffee cake made its appearance on the kitchen counter, everyone passing by cut one piece after another, and this goes without saying every time it had been just to taste a bit (e), until all was gone too fast. My only regret is that I haven’t been able to wait until the full flavor develops, it’s even better the next day.

I adapted my orange marzipan cake from earlier this year, it is still a very similar recipe. The oranges and raspberries work both very well with marzipan, tangy fruits and warm almond flavors. Raspberries are my go to combination as they are in season right now but I can’t wait to try plums, apples or rhubarb. I am also going to add one tablespoon of Amaretto to enhance the almonds flavor next time.

raspberry-marzipan coffee cake

raspberry-marzipan coffee cake
 
butter, marzipan and eggs should be at room temperature
Author:
Ingredients
  • 110 g / ½ cup unsalted butter
  • 200 g / 7 oz. marzipan aka almond paste, finely chopped
  • 3 large eggs
  • 100 g / 3.5 oz. granulated sugar
  • 80 g / 2.8 oz. all-purpose flour
  • 1 ½ tsp. baking powder
  • ¼ tsp. fine sea salt
  • 40 g / 1.4 oz. almond meal
  • 150 g / 5.3 oz. frozen or fresh raspberries
Instructions
  1. Preheat your oven to 175 C / 350 F and grease your baking pan.
  2. In a small bowl mix flour, almond meal, baking powder and salt, set aside
  3. In a larger bowl cream butter and marzipan with your electric mixer about 1 minute.
  4. Add the eggs one at a time, scrap down the bowl if necessary.
  5. Add sugar mix well. Add the flour-mix and mix shortly just until incorporated.
  6. Transfer batter to the prepared baking pan and even the surface. Distribute the raspberries evenly and bake for 30-40 minutes.
  7. Cakes with marzipan tent to brown faster, have an eye on it and cover with aluminum foil if necessary.

 

Raspberry Marzipan Coffee Cake

 

Raspberry and Marzipan Coffee Cake


 

bad reputation

by Eva Felis on June 23, 2014

bad reputation

Some moons ago we celebrated Mr. F’s birthday at Holeman & Finch Public House. We always enjoy their food, in fact they score high on every best burger list nationwide. Today we are not here to talk burger, unfortunately I would love to lay my hands on their recipe…

If you pay a visit to this restaurant and overlook the cocktail menu, you are missing out. In fact you are not just spotting their cocktails listed there, mentioned are also the receipts for each of them, this gives you an idea what your getting into. Did you ever sipped a drink flavored with roses and radishes like their “blood and roses”? I esteem creativity, especially if it tastes so well. However I was smitten by the “bad reputation”, if this cocktail would be a guy, he would be a bearded logger wearing lipstick and a floral shirt, a combination of hard liquor and ladylike features with honeysuckle flower water.

Last weekend I discovered spiced cherry bitters aged in bourbon barrels in a local store called the Preserving Place and I had a bright moment. Let’s put a cherry on top of this bearded logger.

This is no kidding a rather stronger drink, the kind that put hair on your chest but well played down with sweeter accents from elderflower syrup and fruitiness from the cherry bitter and the melting cherries. I love how the cherries slowly bleed out and nicely color the bad reputation.

bad reputation

 

bad reputation
 
Prep time
Total time
 
Recipe adapted from Holeman and Finch Public House in Atlanta.
Author:
Serves: 1
Ingredients
  • 50 ml / 1.5 oz. rum
  • 15 ml / 0.5 oz. bourbon
  • 1 tsp. honey
  • 1 tsp. elderflower syrup
  • 1 dash spiced cherry bitters
  • 3 frozen cherries
  • ice cubes, cocktail drink stirrer, bamboo skewer cut in half
Instructions
  1. Stir the liquids shortly to dissolve the honey. Pour into an old fashioned glass with ice cubes.
  2. For the garnish: spear the cherries with a skewer.
Notes
You can find spiced cherry bitters online, but if not available, just substitute with regular aromatic cocktail bitters.

 

bad reputation

 

 

bad reputation

 


 

blueberry lavender cream scones

by Eva Felis on June 18, 2014

blueberry lavender scones

Moving into a new city forces you to start from scratch in regards of so many aspects of your daily life. It took me one and a half year to figure out where to buy fresh fish, which are the good restaurants, a trustfully and capable dentist and this one is essential in regards of lifesaving: where to find the best coffee in town. I still need a GPS for getting around with the car and that is not going to change very soon. Do you know how many streets in Atlanta have Peachtree in their name? I bet you don’t because no one knows that.

It also took me some time to find a good source for spices. I rarely buy spice blends and prefer to mix them to my own liking. Unfortunately not always successfully but that’s a risk I am willing to take. Scanning through the variations of spices is as inspiring as a visit at a farmers market for me. Lately I stumbled over lavender. How might this taste and what complements it? Turned out blueberries and lavender are a match made in scone heaven. I expected a floral and perfumy taste, somehow like the smell of lavender and that’s basically right. But it also comes with a pleasant herbal touch. If you ever combined blueberry with herbs like mint, cilantro and basil this scones might be something for you.

 

blueberry lavender scones

blueberry lavender cream scones
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 12
Ingredients
  • 250 g / 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 60 g/ 4 Tbsp. granulated sugar
  • 2 ½ tsp. baking powder
  • ½ tsp. fine sea salt
  • 2 tsp. lavender flowers, dried, preferable ground in a spice mill or coffee grounder
  • 70 g/ 5 Tbsp. unsalted, cold butter
  • 140 g / 1 cup blueberries, frozen
  • 240 ml / 1 cup heavy cream + 1 Tbsp. for brushing
  • 1 Tbsp. raw sugar (granulated sugar works fine)
Instructions
  1. Preheat your oven to 200 C / 400 F and grease your baking sheet.
  2. In a bowl, combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt and lavender flowers. Cut in butter, use your hands and rub / knead it in until mixture resembles coarse crumbs.
  3. Carefully fold the blueberries into the batter, try not to mash or bruise the blueberries. Make a well in the center and pour in the heavy cream. Fold everything together just to incorporate; do not overwork the dough.
  4. Press the dough out on a lightly floured surface into a rectangle about 7 by 11 inch (18 x 28 cm). Cut the rectangle in ½ (long side), then cut the pieces in ⅓ again, giving you 6 squares. Cut the squares in ½ on a diagonal to give you the classic triangle shape. Place the scones on the baking sheet, brush the tops with heavy cream and sprinkle with the raw sugar. Bake for 20-30 minutes until beautiful and brown. Let the scones cool for 5 minutes.

 

 

blueberry lavender scones


 

German Krautsalat – coleslaw

by Eva Felis on June 11, 2014

 

german krautsalat

The dust had settled, in retrospect the renovation of my living room had been more than smooth. Gradually I am getting used to the feeling being fortune to life in a house I transformed just the way I like it: fitting to my needs and wishes. The walls between living and dinning room disappeared and the outcome is a bright open space. All what’s missing is an area rug and maybe some decoration, I kind of suck in this department…

I can’t wait to invite guests over for a little dinner party. The crazy thing about this idea is, that now I have enough space around my dinner table, summer kicked in and draws me outside. It’s the time for a picnic in the park, reading on the patio or just hanging out in a beer garden. It doesn’t matter where, as long it’s outside, like it’s a crime to waste the sunny weather being inside. I guess the dinner party has to wait because it’s about time for a BBQ party and as if ordered a big bowl of Krautsalat is already waiting in the refrigerator.

German krautsalat

Although I am smitten with recipes for American-style burgers and ribs but potato salad and coleslaw (Krautsalat) has to be made the German way. One of the greatest things to bring to a grill party for sure is coleslaw, I have to admit some of you maybe need a closer look to agree. While the grill master is taking care of the proteins, the Krautsalat can bear the summer weather pretty well and doesn’t mind to wait outside, due to the lack of mayonnaise. Cabbage itself is pretty healthy and that’s basically the main ingredient. This salad can be fixed in no time and made days ahead and comes with the full palate of flavors, pleasantly tangy, a touch of sweetness, just spicy enough and super crunchy.

german krautsalat

 

German Krautsalat – coleslaw
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • medium head green cabbage
  • 1 large or 2 small red bell pepper
  • for the dressing:
  • 175 ml / ¾ cup white vinegar
  • 60 ml / ¼ cup apple cider vinegar
  • 2 Tbsp. Dijon mustard
  • 3 Tbsp. canola oil
  • 1 tsp. minced garlic
  • ½ tsp. dried red chili flakes
  • 5 Tbsp. granulated sugar
  • 1 Tbsp. fine sea salt
Instructions
  1. Remove the outer leaves, quarter the cabbage and cut out the cores. Slice the cabbage as thin as possible with a knife or use a mandolin or food processor.
  2. Transfer to a large bowl. Quarter the bell pepper and slice into thin stripes. Add to the cabbage and stir well.
  3. In a medium saucepan bring all ingredients for the dressing to boil, stir well. Remove from heat and pour immediately over the cabbage. Cover the bowl with a lid or plastic wrap and let rest for at least 1 hour. At the beginning it seams like not enough dressing but don’t worry it will work. Can be stored airtight in the refrigerator for weeks. Stir well before serving.
Notes
White vinegar is at least 4% acidity and not more than 7%. Cider vinegar is slightly more acidic with approximately 5-6% acidity.

german krautsalat


 

hot brown

by Eva Felis on June 4, 2014

hot brownThe downside of moving to a different city every year is you have to leave your friends behind every time. The upside is you have friend to visit and very good reasons to come back. Last weekend I had been walking in Memphis again. It had been a couple of months since my last visit, but we picked up our friendship right where we left off.

The list maker in me couldn’t resist planning ahead every possible meal in different restaurants during my short stay. Right at the top of this list had been Hog & Hominy. Since I saw their cookbook Collards & Carbonara, I needed to eat there. How on earth could I have missed this restaurant before? How tempting sounds: “…blending traditional southern ingredients with classic Italian techniques for a truly unique style of cooking”. YES! I had been sitting at one of their table just after arriving in Memphis, and I wasn’t even hungry. I gazed at the cook shaping my pizza, tossing the dough, topping with mushrooms and quickly pushing into their wood fired pizza oven. Shortly after that, the pizza sat in front of me and then was gone. Hog & Hominy are not kidding around, their pizza is outstanding. This pizza adventure changed my plans for the rest of my stay in Memphis. I had to come back. This time for lunch and their version of hot brown left a big impression.

Hog & Hominy

 

 

Hog & Hominy

Hot brown is an open-faced sandwich with turkey and/or bacon, Mornay sauce, cheese on white bread, how I recently learned… actually 5 minutes ago. I didn’t know hot brown was a thing. At Hog & Hominy they serve it mile high, a thick cut of good bread, turkey and bacon, gravy and crowned with an egg. I skipped the meat and used mushrooms instead, simplified the sauce and here we go, an easy and fast recipe for a weeknight dinner.

 

hot brown

 

hot brown
 
Author:
Serves: 1
Ingredients
  • ½ pound brown mushrooms
  • 3 green onions, sliced
  • 80 ml / ⅓ cup heavy cream or whole milk
  • 1 Tbsp. all-purpose flour
  • 2 Tbsp. water
  • salt and black pepper to taste
  • 2.5 cm / 1 inch. thick slice of white bread (I use San Francisco sourdough)
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled
  • 1 large egg
  • salt and black pepper to taste
  • 1 Tbsp. clarified butter or oil for the mushrooms + 1 tsp. for the egg
Instructions
  1. Clean the mushrooms, remove the stems and slice. In a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, add the fat of your choice and the mushrooms and stir-fry until browned, about 3-4 minutes. Add green onions and continue cooking 1 minute.
  2. Reduce the heat to medium and pour the heavy cream into the saucepan. In a small bowl mix flour and water, stir well no lumps allowed. Add this mix to the saucepan and bring to boil while continuing stirring. Cook for 1 minute, remove from the heat. The mushroom sauce should be very thick, but we are not aiming for concrete. Add more cream or continue cooking if necessary. Season to taste.
  3. Toast the bread or brown it slightly in a pan. Rub the whole garlic clove vigorously over one side of it.
  4. Fry the egg in a pan with the oil. I like mine sunny side up, a little brown and crispy on the edges and the egg yolks still runny, but that’s up to you.
  5. Assemble the hot brown: put bread garlic side up on a plate, cover with mushroom sauce (reheat if necessary) and top with the fried egg.
  6. Enjoy!
Notes
For seasoning experiment with spices like cayenne pepper, different kinds of paprika powder (spanish smoked should be great)...

 

hot brown


 

Iced Pharisäer- a cold hypocrite

by Eva Felis on May 27, 2014

 

iced Pharisäer Once upon a time on the little island called Nordstrand in the North Sea someday in the 19th century… A festivity took place, the occasion had been a christening. A peasant called Peter Johannsen had become father for the umpteenth time (historians say it might be the sixth or the seventh?) and he had been eager to celebrate this fortunate event properly. Unfortunately the reverend of his church had banned any alcohol, even more he took the pledge. The peasant came up with a brilliant way to hide the booze in plain sight, actually to be accurate in front of the reverend. First off, I’d like to mention that times had been tough. Life wasn’t all beer and skittles near the North Sea back then and especially on this island due to tough weather and severe storms. The islander had been inventive with creating hot beverages that warm up body and soul: tea with a lacing of rum or caraway seed schnaps, Grog (hot water and rum), Tote Tante or Lumumba (hot chocolate with rum). You name it… they put booze in it…iced Pharisäer

Back to our little christening, the coffee had been spiked with rum and topped with whipped cream floating at the top to prevent the alcohol from evaporating and suspicious smelling. I have to give them credit for creativity! This goes without saying the reverend had been served just regular coffee with cream. Everything went well until (it was bound to happen) the laced coffee had been accidentally served to the reverend, who stood up in rage and yelled: “Oh ihr Pharisäer” He called them all hypocrites, according to the bible: Pharisee. This is the story how the “national drink” of the Frisian in the North Sea had been named.

iced Pharisäer

Fun fact: we Germans might be a little particular with having the Reinheitsgebot for beer and there is also a law for the Pharisäer which says 2 cl is not enough, there has to be 4 cl. So please don’t be a criminal, use enough booze. Also it’s still tradition not to stir the (hot) Pharisäer, you have to drink it through the cream.

Here in Atlanta we enjoy beautiful summery days and it’s just not the right weather for hot beverages, so we simply switch: cold Pharisäer for warm days. I like to serve this as a dessert or afternoon treat, after Sunday supper sitting on the porch sipping ice cold Pharisäer.iced Pharisäer

Iced Pharisäer- a cold hypocrite
 
Author:
Recipe type: Drinks
Cuisine: German
Ingredients
  • about 200 ml / 6.8 oz. strong coffee, ice cold
  • 4 cl. / 2 ½ Tbsp. / 1.35 oz. Rum or bourbon whiskey
  • as much vanilla ice cream as you like
Instructions
  1. Prepare your coffee a little stronger when usually, let cool.
  2. Mix everything in a tall glass and enjoy.
  3. I like to add half of the ice cream and stir well to create a creamy and sweat iced coffee, and then add the the other half to let it float on top.
Notes
If you want to cut back on ice cream, use some ice cubes.

iced Pharisäer


 

bean there, done that

by Eva Felis on May 20, 2014

 

Mediterranean-style bean saladYou know what they say: if it tastes good it’s not good for you. These days the only exceptions seams to be chocolate, I am kidding, totally not, that’s what I need to believe. Let’s say there are two exceptions that prove the rule: the delicious Mediterranean cuisine is known for colorful vegetables, lots of omegas from fresh saltwater fish, plant-base proteins from beans, herbs and olive oil and red wine (here you go!). I am not so sure about the latter, but that’s ok.

Green beans have a bad reputation due to the not so much haute cuisine green bean casserole, which appears on every table in the US on Thanksgiving Day. I am talking about the canned mushroom soup version with French fried onion (are those even real food?). But green beans can do better than that, cooked until crisp-tender with flavor from garlic and olives and a hint of lemon.

Such as my imaginary grandma down there in the South of Italy would went to the farmers market and get the freshest ingredients for her dinner, I went to the grocery store and tried my best. I looked for the good olives, pitted but salty and firm, I picked the ripest tomatoes and the brightest green beans. But as it came down to the sourdough bread for the croutons, I had to compromise with store bought croutons and actually liked them. They put more oil on them, when I would ever dare and that’s a good thing. I bailed on the fresh herbs, because I thought I just use some from my herb garden and forgot about that I already harvested what I haven’t killed yet. And I also skipped the onion because I was going to share dinner with someone who couldn’t stand them. Damn it. If I were you I would go for red onions, just saying. I also was more than happy with just the lemon juice, more like a seasoning than a dressing. One of those dressings with anchovies would be great with this salad, if you insist on a dressing. Also Parmesan cheese would be a good substitute for feta.

Mediterranean-style bean salad

Mediterranean-style bean salad
 
Author:
Recipe type: salad
Cuisine: Mediterranean
Serves: 2-4
Ingredients
  • 450 g / 1 lb. green beans (I used Blue Lake Beans)
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • about 6 small tomatoes
  • 100 g / 3.5 oz. pitted green olives
  • 4-5 Tbsp. crumbled feta
  • one handful croutons (homemade is best but store bought is fine)
  • 1 lemon, preferable organic
  • 1-2 tsp. clarified butter, ghee (or 1 tsp. butter and 1 tsp. olive oil) for frying
Instructions
  1. Wash the green beans, trim the ends and cut into 5cm / 2inch. pieces. Bring a large pot of salted water to boil, add beans and cook for 3-4 minutes. Drain and shock in a bowl of ice water. Drain again and let dry on a clean kitchen towel.
  2. Heat a large heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Add clarified butter and beans and cook for 4 minutes, stir occasionally. Add the garlic and sauté until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Transfer the beans to your salad bowl.
  3. Cut the green olives into thirds and the tomato into quarters. In a large bowl combine the fried beans, olives, tomatoes, feta, and croutons. Sprinkle with lemon zest and juice.

 

 

Mediterranean-style bean salad


 

kale pesto with a touch of lemon and capers

by Eva Felis on May 12, 2014

kale pesto-1080

I had been going back and forth about if and how to remodel my living room. The whole situation is a complex one, as in small or rather tiny. I needed to close an opening between two rooms to creating a proper office space but would create a living room in size of a shoebox on the other side of the wall. And who wants to climb over the sofa to cross the room? The solution is actually quite simple, if I put up a wall on one side, I need to remove another wall on the other side. First I convinced Mr. F about the imperative of this operation and then got cold feet and conscience about making such major changes to this almost a century old house.  Confession: I am one of those girls, I start off with having trouble to make a decision and then change my mind every other minute. This one was a tough one, it took me some time, but we finally did it.

kale pesto

As I opened the front door last Monday afternoon, I was able to see all the way through from the future living room, dinning room and kitchen into the garden. Wow. Removing just a few feet of the wall changed the whole place. Although the transformation had just begun, I was impressed and stood there for a while with the door in the hand and my jaw on the ground. Finally I went over to the area where my couch will be situated and pretended to sit down. I ignored the fact that my sofa is actually standing upright in the kitchen to make space for the craftsmen. I walked into every corner and imagined how it is going to look like and how the rays of the sun are going to travel across the rooms. I poured myself a coffee and sat down on one of the kitchen chairs in the middle of the chaos with my mouth full, chewing a satisfying amount of chocolate. For a few moments I simply enjoyed my new house, even though a lot of work still needs to be done.

This was just a quick break in a day full of appointments, so I grabbed my camera and left the house again. I had to be in one of those high-rise office towers in Midtown Atlanta and I was already running a little late. Two hour later I was on the way down, as I saw my reflection in the specular surface of the elevator, the back of my dark pants covered with dust from the kitchen chair I sat down earlier. I guess this is how you should not present yourself to a client, luckily the pictures turned out well, I hope that counts enough.

This was just the first day of renovating, although I am not part of the handymen team, I suffer a little with them. All the dust drives me crazy and cooking is no fun with a sofa and several chairs in your way. And did I mention the dust?

Today is the first day I finally dare to cook again, there had been a lot of take out dinners and eating in bed lately (the little devil in me hoped those days will never end). I had dust flavored coffee and granola a la dust so far. But I got better in leaving the house without taking dust with me. It’s about time for something homemade, greenish and pasta because all this makes me happy.

kale pesto

kale pesto with a touch of lemon and capers
 
Prep time
Total time
 
Easy and fast recipe for pesto with kale and a hint of lemon and caper flavor. Substitute for vegetarian cheese if you like.
Author:
Ingredients
  • 80 g / 2.8 oz. kale, wash and dry
  • 2 Tbsp. pine nuts, dry roasted in the pan
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled
  • zest from ½ - 1 lemon
  • 1½ Tbsp. capers
  • 40 g / 1.4 oz. parmesan or pecorino cheese, grated
  • ½ tsp. fine sea salt
  • 60 ml / ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
Instructions
  1. Add all but the olive oil to the bowl of your food processor and pulse until everything is very finely chopped.
  2. Add oil and chop a few more times.
  3. Serve with pasta, bread or potatoes...
  4. If you need to store leftover pesto, always top with some olive oil and keep refrigerated.